Yes, other airlines are taking advantage of Ryanair's cancellation chaos - but why shouldn't they?    

The tens of thousands of Ryanair passengers caught up in September’s carnage of the flight schedules all have their own stories of alarm, distress and financial loss. 

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Ryanair’s crisis shows the true cost of the low-cost revolution | Gwyn Topham
The airline’s cancellation fiasco is just one example of how companies such as Amazon and Uber are unbundling their costs, says Guardian transport correspondent Gwyn Topham

Ryanair's traffic increased by 10pc in September despite airline cancelling thousands of flights
Crisis-hit Ryanair has said 98pc of customers impacted by its flight cancellation fiasco in September and October have been refunded or transferred on to other flights or transport.

Rein in the free market, Mr Corbyn? But hasn't it just brought naughty Ryanair to its knees...?
The Left imagine themselves to be optimists, but I can’t think of a more depressingly pessimistic message than Jeremy Corbyn’s:

Regulator 'fury' over Ryanair law breach
The Civil Aviation Authority says the airline has failed to make clear its obligations to passengers.

Ryanair passengers grow despite disruption
The airline says passenger numbers were up 10% in September despite the flight cancellation fiasco.

How 'Pilotgate' has actually made Ryanair more powerful than ever
To call Ryanair the “Millwall of the skies” is not a precise analogy. While the Irish airline’s bosses may currently share with the fans of the south-east London football club the sense that nobody is especially fond of them, Ryanair is rather better placed than mid-table in the Championship. Even with 25 planes grounded through the winter because of a shortage of available pilots, the airline will carry 129 million people this year. That’s about 15,000 times the average home attendance at Millwall FC’s Den.